Deepfakes

After posting on deep voicefakes, I saw this (and a few others) on Kottke:

There’s still something uncanny about it, but the technology is obviously very close. I mean, maybe the uncanny thing is just that it’s Steve Buscemi in Jennifer Lawrence’s body with her voice.

The lip-syncing videos are close too, but something still feels a little off to them:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lfa5WvqBSq4

We’re entering a world where you can make a live-action film without any traditional “production”. You can have just writing and post-production.

Write the script.

Then build it with AI-generated voices and images.

Production could be simply a matter of recording the samples to build the voices and recording some video to build the video.

You might not even need that — you could pulls the voices and imagery from a library.

We could bring back dead actors to play leading roles. Want to reunite Bogey and Bacall? Just deepfake it.

We’re going to need a whole new area of IP law for this. Who owns the rights to their image or voice? Do you have rights for that? Does it expire or go into the public domain? How much would the rights to use, say, Bradley Cooper’s digital avatar in perpetuity?

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